Ukraine


One of my current endeavours is to volunteer, teaching Ukrainian refugees English and through this I have got to know the stories of quite a few of them. This was made more graphic last Wednesday as they celebrated their Independence day at the Hub where their classes are held.

Amazingly and impressively they had put together a moving concert of songs and piano recitals revealing talents and abilities not seen by us before as they worked to develop their language skills. This was followed by a feast of Ukrainian dishes before which your disciplined blogger cast aside any thoughts of dietary control.  

It was a wonder to watch their performances and the flow of tears evident among the packed audience: mine among them, and to recall the stories of the various harrowing journeys many of them had made on their way to the quiet town where I live.

We often hide the extraordinary within the ordinary but witnessing the dignity and wish to give their children a normal life among those who had been seperated from their husbands and loved one’s was humbling indeed. They all suffer from one man’s demented megalonamia and I wish I could see some end to the uncertainty which they endure each day. To witness their strength of character and patriotic pride in the face of such uncertainties is humbling indeed. They will be forever in my heart.

About Peter Wells aka Countingducks

Trying to remember what my future is
This entry was posted in character, community, creative writing, Life, Peter Wells, Ukraine and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Ukraine

  1. catterel says:

    Working with refugees is a very humbling experience – suddenly coming face to face with, as you say, the extraordinary that is hidden within the ordinary. They are surely also glad to be able to show their gratitude by giving back something to those who have been helping them.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. beth says:

    how lucky you are to have been a part of this moving experience. it quickly puts everything into perspective doesn’t it? we have nothing to ever complain about. imagine leaving everything you know, In the midst of danger and trauma, and going to a new place where there is nothing familiar to you.

    to work with refugees is something I’ve been drawn to as well, my next goal in life. there is a project here that I plan to be a part of, working with children and families

    Like

  3. Robin says:

    I couldn’t agree more with Beth’s comments. Your words brought tears to my eyes Peter…and thank you so much for sharing your experiences. I too would love to do something similar after I finish the constant advocating for my aging mother. You are an inspiration for all of us!

    Like

  4. tiostib says:

    I am deeply touched by this post, a needed reminder of human courage and good in troubled times. Thank you.

    Like

  5. If there were one thing that I could wish for our children’s future (ok, so they are both grown up) it would be that we, as a race, would realise that we are all one species, with enough to go around, and that there is no need or place for violence and hatred. Greed (and it’s associates dominance and selfishness) are the things that hold us back from peace and harmony, and should, by now, have no place left in our world.
    At least there are people like yourself, Peter, who are doing something to help alleviate the pain and suffering of others.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Jack Eason says:

    Good for you Peter.

    Like

  7. Jack Eason says:

    Reblogged this on Have We Had Help? and commented:
    A special message from Peter

    Like

  8. Well done, wonderful and moving. I wish this war would end it beggars belief. So sad. 😦

    Like

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